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The UI ribbon, more than just evolution

The latest fashion in terms of user interface is the Office ribbon, this thick horizontal bar containing various visual icons grouped by general task. After getting through most of the applications of the well-known suite, the ribbon will also invade most of the Windows accessories soon…

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The recent Microsoft ads

In several recent conversations between Fred and me, we discussed a lot about Microsoft’s marketing strategy, which tends to lag a bit behind compared to that of Apple or Google. The recent advertisement from Microsoft featuring Bill Gates and Jerry Seinfeld was hardly a response to the marketing war led by Microsoft’s competitors who do not hesitate to criticize Microsoft and make its customers like fools. But for now, let’s think about why the Gates/Seinfeld advertisement couldn't be as popular as they could have expected...

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Windows Vista and batch files: UAC changes the rules (Part 2 of 2)

In the previous entry of this series, we discussed about how Windows Vista forced a path change when running a batch file elevated with UAC enabled, which causes the current directory to be different from the batch file location, which creates some problems when running some external tools residing in the batch file directory. The solution I found was to change the current directory at the very start of the batch file execution using a simple sequence.

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Windows Vista and batch files: UAC changes the rules (Part 1 of 2)

Windows Vista… whenever I hear this name, the first I think about is the polemic and only then about the Operating System. Vista has been the target of many criticisms, some justified, some simple matters of personal taste, and some only created to put gasoline on the fire. As such, many IT professionals expressed a great dislike of UAC (User Account Control), one of the main new security features of Vista, especially because they felt it was getting in their ways too often and that they knew their job well enough to not be bugged by it. Even if they are of course able to disable it on the computers they use, they would still have to bear with it on the other computers of their networks or on their customer’s machines: they simply can’t disregard UAC’s existence and have to cope with it and make sure their software and products get along nicely with it.

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